Architecture Monday

Perhaps one of the most famous architectural photos of all time.  Certainly it is one of the most famous of modern architecture, and likely introduced many to this new mode of design and its new architectural ways, forms, and materials.  It was built in 1957 as a Case Study House, which themselves are an interesting thing, some 36 home designs sponsored by Arts & Architecture magazine as experiments in American residential architecture.  This one, the Case Study House #22, overlooks Los Angeles by dramatically cantilevering the glassed-in and nearly transparent living room over the edge of the cliff, something this photo by Julius Shulman does wonders to highlight.  To the eyes of the day it must have appeared completely otherworldly.

The Stahl House (Case Study House #22) by Pierre Koenig.

Philosophy Tuesday

“I don’t think of the arts as competitive at all, I really don’t.

It was such a relief to get out of a world where it was that kind of base competition, zero-sum competition.

The arts are… it’s personal.  You’re just trying to actualize yourself and make the best art you can, and someone else’s victory isn’t your defeat, the way it is in sports.”

Richard Linklater

Wonder Wednesday

There is this amazing scene at the end of Drive My car.  It won’t necessarily spoil anything to watch it now, so even if you haven’t seen it go for it (and then I totally recommend watching the whole thing!).  The setup here that of a “play within a movie” and within the plot it’s got this interesting conceit, that of that each (in-film) actor speaks their native language for their lines.  This scene is the final one of Uncle Vanya, and the (in-film) actress here does her bit in Korean sign language:

Just so deliciously powerful.  The (actual) actor and her acting is amazing, but her performance in how she harnesses the sign language to deliver it, signing both personally but also involving the other actor is brilliant.  All heightened by the expressive and nuanced sign language itself.  Absolutely wonderful.  (As is the rest, see the film!)

Philosophy Tuesday

“Here’s what I have learned after 40 years of making stuff for a living.  I can break a milling bit on this mill, I can be really REALLY mad at myself and the world at the fact that this screw-up has taken me more time and I gotta redo this thing and I can feel all those feelings and I can still, in the mist of that emotional turmoil, walk over to my end mills by 64th drawer and pick up another one and bring it back over and take out the old one and toss it out, put this back in… Just perform the actions.  I don’t feel good, but I don’t necessarily have to feel good in order to proceed.”

Adam Savage

 

What I love about this quote is how it expresses the beauty that comes from integration.  To experience all of our humanness, without denying anything, without resisting anything (and giving them unforeseen control), and without capitulating to anything (and giving them foreseen control).  To be whole and not suffering, engaging all of ourselves as we move forward, creating as we go.