Archive for the ‘Philosophising’ Category

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Philosophy Tuesday

February 4, 2020

Our great desire and need to be known and heard and related

Often shows up to us as “attention being paid to me.”

And yet, so much of our life now is about that not happening.

Through phones interrupting interactions,

Or communication happening online,

Or through some game or thing,

There is always something mediating & hiding whether attention is being paid,

Or displacing the attention,

Or reducing it through memes and emojis and entirely common

(And thus non personal/attention giving)

Modes, means, and methods of communication.

And so we seek it, seek that attention, seek it hard.

And we desire and pursue fame,

Because we think famous people are payed attention.

And we desire and pursue the likes, hearts, reblogs, etc,

Because, gosh, wouldn’t that be grand.

So much attention!

Of course, and unfortunately,

It still wouldn’t be the attention of the type we seek.

We’d be left still wanting,

With a whole host of other, new, barriers and pitfalls.

As the saying goes,

“There’s no cheese down that tunnel.”

Fame, likes, and similar are all and the only the tools we see,

But they’re not the tools that will work.

There are other, more fruitful, ways to spend our energies,

To create the bonds and relations we want.

A chance to leave behind straitjacket systems & tools & their trap of currency,

And simply be present, pay attention, listen, and connect.

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Philosophy Tuesday

January 28, 2020

I mean, it’s not like it’s unclear why we hate being or feeling wrong…  because, in many ways, it makes sense.  Out on the savanna, being right equaled being alive.  A right prediction, a right memory, a right deduction, eating the right food, it all meant we survived for another day.  A wrong prediction, a wrong snack, a wrong turn, all could lead us to being eaten or otherwise not surviving for another day.

No wonder we were given such a potent euphoric reward for being right!

The thing is, though, we don’t live in the savanna anymore.  Not everything is insta-kill or be killed.  Not everything needs to be run through that filter.  And when we let our system of “being right” run amok on autopilot, we often lead ourselves down unhelpful, unhealthy, and even, ironically, down paths that are downright dangerous.  We can become so attached to being right over everything else that we accidentally screw ourselves, along with our friends, family, communities, and humanity.  We hoodwink ourselves into being miserable, into sabotage, and away from the clear and present mind that is necessary for making actual, proper, and lucid, choices.

That is the paradox.  Being attached to being right will often lead us instead to the opposite.  Which, doubly ironically, also means that being attached to being right lowers our chances of that euphoric reward from being right that we crave so much in the first place.  Oops.

When we let go of the savanna attachment and allow ourselves to be present, it gives us all the freedom to shine.  We can walk down the middle path, wending our way forever forward towards the sunny uplands of connectedness, fortune, and the more perfect futures we all crave.

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Philosophy Tuesday

January 14, 2020

“The thing is, meaning is not absolute.  It does not reside inside the artwork to be unlocked or decoded and revealed.  Meaning is something that happens between you and the work.  It’s different for you than it is for anyone else, and it’s always shifting, changing, depending on who you are and where you are, and what’s happening around you.

The artist does not own the meaning.  And neither do the experts or authorities who present it to you.  They are voices in the room, often very good and compelling ones, but ultimately you determine the meaning for yourself and only for yourself. “

Sarah Urist Green from The Art Assignment

 

(Love love love this quote, so much great stuff is buried within!  For starters its a great reminder on how we interact with art and that we are, indeed, interacting with it.  It may seem, at first, like we’re only passive observers but it is quite the opposite — there is a lot going on.  It is almost an ongoing dialogue, and the meaning we create is very much our own that may both include and be irrespective of that of the artist’s.

Even greater however is that we can replace “art,” “artist,” and “artwork” with “events,” “the world,” or “our life” in order to delve into the quote even deeper and explore its implications, inspirations, and liberations in whole new ways.  What layers can we uncover in doing so?  What dialogues that we thought we had long ago settled upon can we re-engage with?  What new futures might we write?

So much to unpack, both in the quote and inside of our created meanings.  Very well said.)

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Philosophy Tuesday

January 7, 2020

Your brain doesn’t know the difference between a threat against your body and a threat against your identity.

To your brain, and your calculating self, they are the same, and it will fight back equally hard against either of them.

Thing is, only one of them is actually fatal.

The other is a chance for a glorious transformation, stepping forward into a new light that you, and your authentic self, will love much more.

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Philosophy Tuesday

December 31, 2019

You are whole and complete

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You always have been

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And you always will be

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You may not experience it

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And you may sometimes take actions that don’t reflect it

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But it doesn’t change the truth of who and what you are

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There are just barriers to your experiencing it

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Welcome to the New Year

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Whole and Complete

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Philosophy Tuesday

December 17, 2019

It is always good to remember that apologies

(True, authentic apologies)

Are not automatic means to an end.

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We cannot simply put a quarter

Into the “apology/forgiveness machine

And expect that all is forgotten,

And we go back to doing whatever it is

We want to do.

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Real apologies take courage,

They take vulnerability,

And they come from a place

Of ownership and responsibility.

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We are OFFERING an apology,

That may or may not be ACCEPTED.

And even if it IS

That doesn’t mean

That there won’t be any CONSEQUENCES.

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To truly apologize

We offer the apology,

And then take

(Yes, take!)

WHATEVER WE GET.

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We acknowledge the impact

That our actions have had,

Whether intentional or not,

And we make no demands.

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We ask for forgiveness.

And we take what we get.

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Philosophy Tuesday

December 10, 2019

Avoid basing your identity on beliefs or things

Instead, base it on values or intentions

 

(As we walk around in life, each of us a conglomeration of identities, some chosen, mostly not, and often forgetting that we were are the sole and final authors of our identities, there are a lot of good pointers and reminders on how to best put our identities together.  The one above is nice and succinct.  Beliefs rarely are eternally solid and often call us towards attachment, clinging tightly no matter what and no matter the detrimental outcomes.  Values and intentions, however, beget multiple ways of being that call us powerfully into action that fulfill us while remaining adaptable, open to shift and always aiming towards our central, authentic, selves.)