Posts Tagged ‘art’

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Philosophy Tuesday

November 20, 2018

“From time to time we receive letters from readers who wonder why there’s so much moralizing in our mags. They take great pains to point out that comics are supposed to be escapist reading and nothing more. But somehow, I can’t see it that way. It seems to me that a story without a message, however subliminal, is like a man without a soul. In fact, even the most escapist literature of all – old time fairy tales and heroic legends – contained moral and philosophical points of view. At every college campus where I may speak, there’s as much discussion of war and peace, civil rights, and the so-called youth rebellion as there is of our Marvel mags per se. None of us lives in a vacuum – none of us is untouched by the everyday events around us – events which shape our stories just as they shape our lives. Sure our tales can be called escapist – but just because something’s for fun, doesn’t mean we have to blanket our brains as we read it!

Excelsior!”

— Stan Lee

 

Storytelling is one of the, if not the, thing that makes us human.  It is one of our greatest gifts.  A good story can excite us, can move us, can inspire us, can make us feel all manner of feels.  Stories can touch us deeply.  And, most importantly, it is through stories, both heard and our own, that we come to know ourselves and our world.  Our very identity and relation to the world is codified through story.  This conflux of narratives is what gives us our experience of life.

Storytelling is something that is to be honoured, cherished, nurtured, supported.  The stories we tell are just as important as the equations and knowledge and skills we teach.  Entertainment is fabulous!  And entertainment is never in opposition to great and intentful storytelling.

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Architecture Monday

November 19, 2018

This is by architect Tadao Ando.  So you know it will have spaces that evoke, quite viscerally, feelings of exquisiteness and marvel.  His mastery of light and form and proportion and volume is second to none.

Even if you haven’t been a follower of of my previous architecture posts, with an intro like that I don’t need to say that he’s definitively one of my favs.  I’ve admired many of his buildings, but this one has something extra unique and of interest to me:  it’s an adaptive reuse of an existing building, an insertion into a robust and formal brick shell, using the pre-existing walls and openings to create new forms and experiences within.

From those powerful atriums, where his silky and monochrome concrete forms play beautifully off the rich and rough red brick, to the more intimate and subdued galleries, to the new rooftop pavilion and glass-lined walkways, there’s almost no moment that doesn’t delight.

A wicked tour de force.  And much easier for me to visit than heading off to Japan again.  Very much on my list of places to visit.

Wrightwood 659 Exhibition Space by Tadao Ando & Associates

 

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Wonder Wednesday

November 14, 2018

Cute little kitty ramen truck!

by Tim McBurnie

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Wonder Wednesday

October 31, 2018

Some mighty fine old school animation, coupled with the absolutely powerful, marvelous, and moving score by Jerry Goldsmith…

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Wonder Wednesday

October 24, 2018

A journey; to where?

Sometimes, it matters not.

The fantastical always awaits.

art by Matt Rhodes

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Philosophy Tuesday

October 23, 2018

There was this great ad for Ikea from years ago, directed by Spike Jonze:

Objects cannot make decisions.  Objects do not grow.  Objects do not make meanings in their lives.  Objects do not possess agency.  Objects lack emotion.  Objects cannot create and act and cavort and cry and all the things people (and other living things) can do.  Objects are fixed, predictable, unmalleable.  Objects are either working or broken.  Objects can be thrown away.

People are not objects, of course.

But we turn people into objects all the time.

Whenever we act like how we see, label, relate, or think of someone, and like the meaning they have for us is the right one, the true one, the one and only one, we’ve turned them into a thing.  An object.  An other.

We do this to our coworkers, management, professions, and the clerk at the store.  We do it to hobby groups, enthusiasts, and fans of a thing.  We do it to genders.  We do it to whole cities and whole countries just as readily as we do it to our siblings, parents, friends, neighbors, and lovers.

When we objectify, we exterminate.  The vital being entity that stands (metaphorically, perhaps) before us is snuffed out, and a thing is all that remains.

And the trouble is, we don’t treat things the same way as we treat people.

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Wonder Wednesday

October 10, 2018

A diary of math and wonderous (and amusing!) drawings:

… and it all culminates in this:

An 18th century chicken in trousers.

See the whole hilarious thread on twitter here from the Museum of English Rural Life