Posts Tagged ‘creating space’

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Architecture Monday

November 12, 2018

I’m not going to lie; this post is almost entirely driven by that first image.  Something about that lush greenery (it’s in Indonesia), surrounded by the solidity and blue-grey texture of the surrounding walls, with that pathway emerging to head over a bridge made of that same blue-grey stone over a pool of placid water to mark the boundary before stepping onto a terrazzo floor while a canopy of warm wood floats overhead, all counterpointed by that wood vase… yeah.  I dig it.

I also won’t lie to say I don’t have some concerns for this house’s location and size, perched on a steep hillside in what seems to be spectacular countryside.  So I’m a bit conflicted about this one, not knowing the full context and what may have been taken away to create these beautiful moments — sometimes just because we can build somewhere doesn’t mean we ought to.  And of beautiful moments, this house does indeed have plenty, with lots of lovely interplay between the surrounding vegetation and the built spaces of the house, with vistas and openings and courtyards and hanging gardens, oh my!

Inventive and a great blend of traditional house types with modern sensibilities.

The Chameleon Villa, by Word of Mouth Architecture

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Architecture Monday

November 5, 2018

I posted about the new Calgary Central Library earlier this year while it was still under construction… and now it’s done and open!

And it still looks great.  I waxed poetic a bunch about the lovely spaces that the renderings were beginning to develop, and the photos of the real deal show that it shines through in its final built form.  I still especially dig how it straddles the new light rail line, and the way they use the twin curves to inform the layout, creating the sensual atrium surrounded by a mix of spaces, all culminating in the communal “living room” at the building’s prominent prow.

This was one of my favourite renderings, and I like it even more in actuality, the way it frames the end of the street, and how the contrast heightens the features and beauty of both the old and the new.

Always fun to see the design/renderings and the final product, and it’s doubly great when the final form equals (or even, in some instances, surpasses) the pristine control of a computerized view.  Good stuff.  Now I’m even more keen to sometime.

The Central Calgary Library by Snøhetta

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Architecture Monday

October 29, 2018

Here’s something simple and fun:  start with a renovation, tack on a new bit onto the front of the existing building, and make it super playful in bold colour and with interlocking, triangular, operable, shutters.

Straightforward and effective all by humble means.  Nice!

Green Shutter House by OOF Architecture

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Architecture Monday

October 22, 2018

I do so love rammed earth construction.  (So much so that it was one of my first Architecture Monday posts.)  Something about it exudes warmth for me, often coupled with a delightful tactile roughness along with the beauty from the colourful striations.

So that I love this office in Paraguay is no surprise.  Made with reused formwork, recycled glass, and encircling existing trees, what would be a box is otherwise twisted into a spiral to enclose the office, kitchenette, toilet, and, of course, the trees.  Cuts in both the walls and ceiling let in plenty of light to splay across those rough walls to create a lovely play of shadow that changes throughout the day.

Basic in form, this is a great example of how wonderful space can be created without breaking the bank.  All it takes are deft hands and minds, care, and a desire to build something beautiful.

Earth Box by Equipo de Arquitectura (who occupy this very office)

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Architecture Monday

October 15, 2018

This is a little house that packs a big punch.  Nestled tightly on a small lot, it presents itself as a lovingly crafted wood box, with vertical slits the only indication of the jewels within.

Inside, weave themselves around three open-air gardens, bathing each room in ample light and serene views.  A hearth greets at the entryway, leading to the common area before spiraling off to the bedrooms and tatami room.  Though not big in actual size it doesn’t feel cramped and makes the most of its restrictive lot.

I especially like that tatami room, accessed through a narrow corner entryway to create an area secluded from the rest of the house yet still open to the greenery.  And at night, cleverly positioned lights create wonderful shadow play across the walls and floors.

It’s a spare aesthetic for sure, done well through meticulous craft.  Nicely done.

House in Akashi by arbol

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Architecture Monday

October 8, 2018

I don’t normally post renders of “might be built” buildings, but this one caught my eye.  For one, it is in Toronto, near a district I used to walk through all the time.  For two, there’s something compelling to me about the design.

The old building on-site, listed on the city’s historic register, originally housed (I think) a library.  The lower level, which admittedly has likely been renovated into blandville over the years, is nothing to write home about, but the second story has these pronounced decorative pilasters, windows, and a gaggle of other accoutrements.

What makes the new building nifty to me is how it uses those elements in its design.  It’s not a copy, not by a long shot (nor should it be), but that same language of those windows is carried forth along on the second story.  I especially like how then it is reinvented on the first floor, with large arched storefront windows and, even more wickedly, with the two half-arches that meet at each corner.  These corner arches open and ultimately dissolve the corners at the first floor, giving the building a very interesting profile and creating naturally inviting entry points.

The building then continues by being a great example of how to design with an eye to context.  The brick lends texture and a call back to the history of the buildings that surround it.  The reveal between the first and second story, as well as the cornice at the second story, tie into the horizontal lines of the store next door.  The cornice itself recalls the original building while also speaking to the adjacent old fire hall.  And the two new levels, delicate glass boxes, step back from the street, creating not only green garden/patio spaces but also reducing the building’s bulk.

I’m sold.  A great example of how our everyday buildings in the middle of a city done by completely commercial interests can still be, and should be, nicely designed.

12 Ossington by Hariri Pontarini Architects.

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Architecture Monday

October 1, 2018

Adaptive reuse, highly textured and rugged insertions, large mechanical devices operated by hand cranks… yep, it must be a design by Olson Kundig!

And how!  Once an old mechanic’s garage, the walls, ceiling, and windows all proudly wear the patina of time.  Within this rich background are added the equally industrial-like bits to turn the space into a winery and a company HQ.  Large pivoting windows replace the old garage doors, allowing the tasting room to become part of the sidewalk and vice-versa.  Everything within the room (including a large seating platform that doubles as a stage) is movable to allow as many uses as possible, from tasting to dinner to dancing to poetry to music jams.

Offices occupy the other half of the building, separated by or alternately opened to the winery via a single step up and large sliding solid steel plates that fit the look perfectly.

Yeah, I like this one a lot.  It hits so many of my aesthetic inclinations. Good stuff.

Charles Smith Winery and World HQ by Olson Kundig