Posts Tagged ‘creating space’

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Architecture Monday

May 21, 2018

Just saw that Hiroshi Sambuichi won the 2018 “Daylight Award.”  Ok, somewhat odd sounding award to win, natch, but his work is a beaut and does indeed do some lovely — and quite stunning — things with light and views.  I spoke of his building that I visited on Naoshima Island here, indeed making note of the qualities of light that were present.

Every picture above makes me want to visit and explore each of the buildings in detail.  The angled frames crossing a path with light at the end of a dark corridor?  What is it?  Where does it lead?  I can feel the experience of the space just from the photo.  Or feel the serenity of the setting sun, reflecting off the perfectly smooth pool of water at the edge of the forever-going overhang that frames a riveting horizontal slice of the world.  Or that cistern!  The old and worn and rugged brick in contrast with the smooth and vibrant wood, punctuated by the flash of green, the moss that brings life in the shafts of light, heightened even further by the glass block that catches and makes physical the rays of sun.  Sign.  Me.  Up!

Wonderful work.  All noted for future travels.

Hiroshi Sambuichi, laureate of the 2018 The Daylight Award.

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Architecture Monday

May 14, 2018

Admittedly, I may just be posting this due to the amazing and theatrical atmosphere of that opening photo… not to mention fond memories of the maple syrup sugar shacks back home… but this really is a nice project.  A sugar factory in China, it’s designed with great dual purposes in mind:  be all it needs to be for the three months of the year when production occurs and be available for a multitude of uses by the community during the rest.

To that end, the complex consists of several high-bay corrugated steel sheds, crisscrossed with generous bands of glass and assembled into a cluster of enclosed and open spaces, themselves crisscrossed by walkways and loggias.  Nestled up against the fields that supply the raw material, it engages both the land and the people that converge to make the magic.

Etched glass walkways let visitors see the production when it’s in full swing, while the covered and open-air courtyards provide ample space for all manner of activities organized by the townspeople, including daily tea, films, puppet theaters, community meals, and dances.

Steel, wood, and carefully placed brick combine well to give a rugged yet refined feel to the complex, while the windows and many pathways easily guide you throughout, and allow for chance encounters.

Great work.  A factory that’s amazing for the workers, and amazing for the town.

Brown Sugar Factory by DnA

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Architecture Monday

May 7, 2018

I call this… playing with brick!

Saint Peter House by Estudio Tecali and Proyecto Cafeina

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Architecture Monday

April 30, 2018

Story Pod is an apt name for this wonderful little jewel of a book box that unfurls to become a lending library and reading room all in one.  It also does a great job of showing just how a quiet, secure, and intimate space can be created with just a few elements.

Like a lantern at night, the books in window motif, coupled with the two thin strips of LED lighting, leave no question as to what this pavilion is all about.  It’s simple, elegant, and a great community builder, letting people grab a read while lazily viewing (and hearing!) the river nearby.

Lovely.  Story Pod by Atelier Kastelic Buffey.

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Architecture Monday

April 23, 2018

This is one of those buildings that make my eyes ask, “Is what I’m seeing real?  Or a dream?”

Quite real, it turns out, but this is still one trippy library.  It’s over the top, of course, but purposefully so, and for a civic place like a library it’s quite appropriate and fun.  Just don’t try to get one of the books on those top shelves…

Tianjin Binhai Library by MVRDV + Tanjin BPDI

 

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Architecture Monday

April 9, 2018

I first saw the Strawberry Vale school while I was in university, and I fell in love with it immediately.  There’s a lot of great stuff going on here, an inventive take on the idea of an elementary school that creates an amazing array of spaces that I certainly would have enjoyed the heck out of during my primary school days.  A playground of geometry that, if it seems like it erupted from the ground, it is because, in a way, it did; situated near a rock outcropping, the school follows the forms and contours to organize itself in a nifty way.

The key to the whole composition is in that winding hallway (although it almost feels pejorative to call such a big feature a mere hallway) off which classrooms, libraries, gyms, and more jut out into the landscape.  Full of level changes as it follows the land outside, it’s a visual treat and a logical way to organize a school.

The images speak well for themselves.  Ramps, stairs, corners, and more make for niches and protected alcoves that can be taken over by teachers and classrooms, while at the same time encompassing larger and enclosed spaces for many of the school’s shared functions.

The creative geometry of that central spine also allows for an abundance of light to enter every room, often in multiple ways and from multiple directions.  This is a dynamic building, with all the angles and jungle-gym like structure and the changing light throughout the day.  In addition, there’s a focus towards the woodlands that surround the school, tying nature back into the learning experience.

This is one cool and exciting school.  I don’t doubt the kids here gain a whole lot from the building and their environment as from the teachers themselves, there’s enough here to keep the mind engaged and amused.  Really great stuff.

Strawberry Vale Elementary School by Patkau Architects

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Architecture Monday

April 2, 2018

Here’s a rather remarkable house renovation.  I say remarkable, because without being told I wouldn’t have known that it wasn’t new.  Done, as these things often are, on a budget, it uses a few creative moves to maximum effect, crafting some mighty fine living areas including a sweet roof garden.

Most noticeable of course is the new face to the house.  It’s very cool how just by using a simple repetitive pattern of darkly stained wood, punctuated by a few elements, such as the larger gaps between boards breaks it down into a grid within a grid, or how light comes through certain boards compared to others, makes the whole affair look like a finely crafted jewel box.  I especially like how the trellis punctuates things with it’s difference and its greenery.  The shadow play is also fun, both between all the boards but especially in the little bits such as off the water chain.

Inside, the space has been left largely open, with spaces mostly delineated by thickened cabinetry and shelving.  Lots of carefully crafted light, lots of space to move, lots of places to display books, knick knacks, and more.

It’s an oddly shaped and small site, but both the on-ground landscaping and that roof garden make the most of it.

This is solid work.  Modest comes to mind as a word, but most certainly not in a pejorative sense – there’s no reason why something done without unlimited funds and without grandiosity cannot be both done and done well.  This would be a great house to live in.

The Sparrow House by Samantha Mink