Architecture Monday

They say California is in love with their cars… which leaves lots of extra car and road bits around… so why not get playful and use them into your architecture?

Road signs for fences and railings and siding, hatchback glass for awnings, station wagon tails for a a gate, plus repurposed sheet metal and more!

Something fun by Leger Wanaselja Architecture

 

 

Architecture Monday

A play of light and shadow, a patter of falling rain, a breeze that flows throughout, and a house that organizes itself around a covered courtyard pool, with geometric perforated concrete panels that lets all the above happen.

And geometric boldness pretty much rules the day all throughout the house.  There’s lots of cool stuff going on, as the house pulls and stretches this way and that to catch the light or a breeze.  Or to catch a tree, embracing a towering royal palm tree that becomes another courtyard.

The great hall, no surprise, is really the centerpiece, opening without barrier to the pool with the three skylights (two angled to catch the morning sun, the other to catch the evening) being just the beginning as the concrete screen above the pool further lets the light dance about.  As a bonus, the cross-ventilation from this open screen above the pool, plus those on the front and back of the house, keeps it cool and pleasant and lets everyone be late into the evening before any lights need to be turned on.

Great designs embrace their context, and this house does so in spades.  Great work, and looks like a very fun place to live.

Casa Delpín by Nataniel Fúster

Architecture Monday

It’s funny, I’ve just been musing about a little backyard studio, and this one pops up on my radar out of nowhere .  I don’t have as large a property… or a hill… so it wouldn’t work as a template for my place, but there’s plenty to enjoy in this whimsical little addition.

It pretty much speaks for itself, with its arched windows and scalloped railing for the nice little roof deck to give it a ‘secret garden’ vibe.  The ceiling within curving upwards to meet a large linear skylight is unexpected and noteworthy however, bringing ample light to suffuse the interior in a powerful glow.

Pandemic WFH office, art or writing studio, or just a fanciful little retreat, nice and simple but anything but boring.  Cool stuff.

Stiff Peaks by Byben & Skeens

Architecture Monday

Oh this is neat!  A new trio of apartments to be added atop an existing building – but rather than just make the new units and call it a day, this project goes above (kinda literally) and beyond to create a new trio of public yards for everyone in the complex to use:  a play area, a couple of decks, and a grassy knoll.  And while that last one might seem like a joke, it is not!  Even further, it is crowned by an outlook to survey the city all around.

Very nifty, a cool addition to a dense Copenhagen neighborhood.

Hedonistic Rooftop Penthouses by… A ha!  Designed by the same firm who did the iceberg apartments I visited (and posted photos from here) while in Denmark, JDS.

Architecture Monday

I have a bit of a love/hate relationship with masonry and brick.  The banal, everywhere, front-façade-only, use of brick veneer on a generic house, well… that can go jump in a lake.  But highly expressive, truthfully used, rich textured brick, made even better when it’s got history and patina?  From what I’ve posted before on this blog, I think it’s quite clear that I’m totally into that.

This one can’t fulfill the history and patina part, but no matter; feast your eyes on this beauty!

If there was a picture needed for “expressive brick”, this, without a doubt, would fit the bill perfectly.  There’s so much going on, it’s hard to know where to begin.  A reinterpretation of a traditional fortress, it’s got inward-canted walls, rounded (or not!) corners, a dark stone base that rises into a vibrant brick top, bits of stone or brick that jut out or are recessed inward, and it culminates with arching brick latticeworks that top it off like a crown.  All this then further punctuated by patterned concrete boxes that poke out to form rooms or balconies.  It’s exquisite.

And it gets even better within.  Formed around a central shaft and stair, the different levels spiral upwards, creating numerous courtyards and porches and allowing nearly all parts of the house to be visually connected to each other.  The latticed stone and brick are left exposed inside, often further articulated and accentuated to provide a rich backdrop and a sense of solidity.  Best of all is the quality of light, sifting through the openings and lattices in ways both dramatic and serene.

Can this get much better?  How about yes;  the openings were not arbitrary and were instead designed with the venturi effect in mind to naturally cool and ventilate the house, and the roof collects water in a traditional kund and stores the excess in a cistern.  It’s designed to be a part of the world, not apart from it.

Needless to say, great stuff.  A wonderful piece of work.

The Gadi House by  PMA madhushala

Architecture Monday

Oh wow, the funkitude is strong with this one!  The curves, the copper, the protrusions, the sinuous shingle work, the way hit juts out from its sloping site to fly into the trees…

This is a house that is very much tailored to its owner, with little bits all over designed to support their lifestyle, from the meditation apertures (with wild circular glazing) to the acoustic ceiling for chorale singing to the gardens and the flow of inside and out.  Whether you like its particular stylings or not, it’s definitively got flair.

I dig it.  Very unique and fun and I bet the owner is super happy in it.  Creatively fantastic.

The Wilkinson Residence by Robert Harvey Oshatz.

Architecture Monday

This is a nifty little building experiment.  Starting with the humble brick wall, this renovation explores quasi-thickening the exterior façade to provide both texture as well as interior utility.

The result is this rich brick wall laid out in this checkerboard pattern of solid and void, whether windows or actual void at the top where a roof terrace resides.  The thickening part comes from pushing in each edge of the checkerboard to create a waffle of alcoves.  On the outside, each of the windows is pushed in, allowing for plants and greenery to grace the city.

Within, each of these alcoves are used for built-in desks, shelving, seating, or other furniture.  Windows alternate from low to high, a sculptural assemblage that brings visual interest and also lets light penetrate deep within the units.

This is cool.  It takes a local tradition and building material, and uses it in a new way to create a nifty face to the city (+ greenery) while also doing double duty and trying out something different for the apartments inside.  Plus the name of the project is a lot of fun:

“Operation Between Walls” by Natura Futura Arquitectura

Architecture Monday

This is a fun little take on the ‘typical’ shipping container house.  By slicing some of the containers along the diagonal (like they were the target of some giant’s sword practice) before stacking them the house gains a strong geometric form that rises from the ground and strikes out towards the sky.

As a bonus, this sculptural move also creates a series of open air decks and patios, giving every level of the house its own garden (or pool!) along with plenty of light, all culminating in a roof deck that overlooks the surrounding neighborhood.  On the flipside, the rising form also allows for a subterranean garage which further allows the property to be free for living space.

What I really appreciate in the house are all the little bits that take advantage of the shipping container as a module and as a material:  The slit windows that fit between the corrugations and create dramatic lighting patterns on the floor and ceiling.  The electrical outlets hiding within the container’s C-channel frames.  The brightly painted sleeping pods nestled within the perfect with of a container module.  And how the parking cut on the underside is leveraged to create raked seating for a home theatre.

But the house goes beyond being just cute and inventive, it’s got a great feel to it with plenty of light and texture, especially from the wood floors and ceilings (which also appear to be from recycled materials).  I like it lots, great stuff.

Carroll House by LOT-EK

Architecture Monday

I’ve prided myself on being able to Tetris space really well… no matter if it’s packing a car or making the most of my living space.  However, I gotta say this small house really elevates the art of Tetrising to a whole new, delicious, level!

This tiny home is built in a hutong, a narrow alley between an existing wall and adjacent building.  And not only that, it’s wrapped around a corner.  But it’s no dark, awkward, and cramped hovel.  By leaving one edge continually open as a kind of atrium hallway – including making great use of the tall and curved wall it adjoins by painting finishing it white and running a continual skylight along its edge – and placing nearly all of the living spaces on the other side as a series of adaptable cubic follies, it’s got great flow, feeling airy and even expansive.

Varying in height and chock full of tiny living tricks, bits of these follies slide and shift to reconfigure the spaces as needed to accommodate various uses, providing plenty of communal day space that becomes more private as it shifts to sleepy time.  At one end, a large glass door and window is actually one giant unit that can swing completely open, making the back patio and the house into one.  Equally nifty is that the cubes are fully climbable, leading to spaces left dedicated to children play, study, and sleep areas.  It’s kind of like the ultimate bunk bed or tree house, but still inside.  (Fear not, the adults aren’t completely left out of the fun, for on the other side of the L, there’s also a mezzanine bedroom and office.)

(And seeing that bench brings me a smile, for I have one of those in my foyer as well!   Though sometimes it’s also used to practice kung fu… then again, for all I know, so is the one in the photo…)

I love this.  Really smart design that creates an awesome house in the most conventionally unlikely of places, showing that the boxes in our mind of what a house needs to be can be quickly expanded with some carefully packed yet playful boxes in a creative home.  Nicely done.

Dengshikou Huton Residence by BLUE Architecture Studio

Architecture Monday

It’s no big secret that I love rough, rich, exposed textural brick (yet I am way less of a fan of brick veneer, curiously).  I also love clean lines and careful attention to detail that punches through to both accentuate and punctuate.

All of which is why this house is such a delight for me, for it has all the above in spades.  A clean plastered box on the outside with an equally clean standing seam roof, it turns into a rich delight on the inside with its exposed brick and equally exposed wood roof framing above.  Thick steel frames jut out in several places, creating entryways and window porticos.

While using few elements the diversity in feeling for each space within is great.  There’s plenty to love in here, but my favourite has to be the office /bedroomwith the ladder-accessible loft.

Very nicely done.  House V by Martin Skoček.