Posts Tagged ‘house’

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Architecture Monday

May 7, 2018

I call this… playing with brick!

Saint Peter House by Estudio Tecali and Proyecto Cafeina

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Architecture Monday

April 2, 2018

Here’s a rather remarkable house renovation.  I say remarkable, because without being told I wouldn’t have known that it wasn’t new.  Done, as these things often are, on a budget, it uses a few creative moves to maximum effect, crafting some mighty fine living areas including a sweet roof garden.

Most noticeable of course is the new face to the house.  It’s very cool how just by using a simple repetitive pattern of darkly stained wood, punctuated by a few elements, such as the larger gaps between boards breaks it down into a grid within a grid, or how light comes through certain boards compared to others, makes the whole affair look like a finely crafted jewel box.  I especially like how the trellis punctuates things with it’s difference and its greenery.  The shadow play is also fun, both between all the boards but especially in the little bits such as off the water chain.

Inside, the space has been left largely open, with spaces mostly delineated by thickened cabinetry and shelving.  Lots of carefully crafted light, lots of space to move, lots of places to display books, knick knacks, and more.

It’s an oddly shaped and small site, but both the on-ground landscaping and that roof garden make the most of it.

This is solid work.  Modest comes to mind as a word, but most certainly not in a pejorative sense – there’s no reason why something done without unlimited funds and without grandiosity cannot be both done and done well.  This would be a great house to live in.

The Sparrow House by Samantha Mink

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Architecture Monday

March 19, 2018

A double spiral.  One is a garden.  The other is house.  Together they intertwine to create living spaces that are never more than a step away from greenery.

From the living room (which overlooks even more greenery along with a pond/pool in the generous rear yard) through the kitchen to the office to the bedroom, the continuous meadow-like greenery follows the rise of the house, leading up towards a bonus garden on the roof.  As could be expected, the house is filled with light from this spiraling courtyard.  The materials within are kept simple and clean, to better highlight the lushness of the foliage nearby – in a way like a gallery, the windows taking the place of frames, and the garden the painting.

I like this a lot.  I can imagine the design brief:  we want as much of our lot to be garden as possible, and we want it to be as visible from the house as possible.  Lifting the garden/ground plane up and wrapping the two together is a great solution, leading not only to the ample garden views, but some very interesting ceilings and room geometries.  As a bonus, the combination of the green roof, integrated with water collection ponds at the edges of the roof, plus all the natural light and the solar panels make for a very sustainable house.

Gorgeous greenery, fun rooms, lovely spaces, and a house that gives back to the environment.  That’s one very sweet combination.

MeMO house by BAM! Arquitectura

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Architecture Monday

February 26, 2018

This is a lovely little office/guest house/pavilion in the Netherlands.  It’s ringed with glass, built of warm wood, and has a striking roof made of raked bands that create strong shadow lines.

Inside is open and filled with yet more warm wood, with its own striking feature in the fashion of a ceiling that shoots upwards to capture as much volume as possible.  Nicely, this ceiling also creates a subtle division of the space below into that of “room” and of “circulation” that rings the entire pavilion.

Truth be told though, I think I’m most in love with this bedroom.  Though maybe it’d be better to call it a sleeping pod – just big enough for a bed, but shooting up towards a skylight to create a quiet and magical space for slumber.

To me, it feels like a nice blend of Scandinavian and Japanese motifs.   Finely crafted, it manages to be both serene and expressive at the same time.   Nicely done.

Tiny Office Pavilion Vught by studio PROTOTYPE

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Architecture Monday

February 12, 2018

This is a cool project, both because of the (rather wild!) result, but also where its expressive forms came from.  The client had access to a gaggle of century old douglas fir beams, all milled from a single tree, and all different lengths and overall sizes.  Rather than cut or otherwise finish any of those beams, the architect chose to use them as-is, warping the geometries of the house to accommodate them all.

And what a wonderful warped set of geometries it is, allowing for an expansive and hyper expressive set of rooms and spaces.  With its abundance of angular forms, it’s quite the playground where light and shadow can dance, both from the generous amounts of windows, but also from the suspended globes of light that create floating constellations of light at night.  An effect that is also carried through by piercing similarly random holes through doors and shutters.

I love how the kitchen counter becomes a table becomes a vertical library becomes a set of stairs that becomes the floor into the upper parts of the house.  There’s a plethora of little built-in touches like this throughout the house, and it, along with the unifying theme of those “hanging stars”, help provide a sense of unity and continuity inside what could otherwise seem like an arbitrary jumble of forms.

I think this is pretty rad, a super fun home to live in.  Very nicely done.

The 23.2 house by Omer Arbel Office

Bonus image!

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Architecture Monday

October 23, 2017

Continuing on with my experience at the Monterrey Design Conference, another of the speakers was Sou Fujimoto, and it was another great lecture that got me thinking about things in new ways.  He started his presentation comparing how the forest and the city were, in certain, ways, quite similar.  That seemed almost preposterous as a starting point, but he drew it out nicely – in particular was that in the forest, there are layers upon layers that float overhead (leaves, branches, etc) to form a canopy, and much the same happens in the urban environment (electric lines, signs, awnings, etc).  Huh… cool, I can get that.  Consider my perception expanded!  And looking at his work as it was presented back to back to back, there was this recurring concept and design generator of the repeated, of layers, and of the individual(s) clustering together to create a whole.

House N is one example of how these concepts get expressed, through the idea of a box in a box in a box.  Noting how the traditional house in the neighborhood was pushed towards the back of the lot, with a front lawn or garden that was often, in many ways, unused, House N starts by encapsulating the yard in the first of its three, heavily pierced, sensuously smooth white boxes.  The many openings in the box let both light in and the trees and garden inside out, creating a small semi-private courtyard that nonetheless can still participate in the streetscape.

Inside this outer box, two more similar boxes (both white, both with many openings) form the house proper…

The net result is a highly intricate collection of planes and openings, forming the proverbial leaf canopy through which you can catch glimpses of other rooms, the garden, and the sky beyond.  As you move through the house, these views continually shift, as does the light throughout the day as the sun traces its path across the sky.

Paths within the house align with a porch and chairs in the courtyard.  It looks a bit sparse in these photos, but as the trees grow and the foliage becomes thicker, the play of random and green will really sing against the white and rectilinear background of the outer box.  At the other end, the Tatami room offers a similar serenity indoors.

It’s a nifty idea, with lots of playfulness and getting every ounce out of its tight lot.  Nice work.

House N by Sou Fujimoto

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Architecture Monday

August 28, 2017

There’s something nicely rhythmic about this apartment conversion in Budapest.  Check out how the way the kitchen and bathroom niches are framed individually in muscular wood (in a pleasing ratio to each other), while at the same time they also continue upward to encompass a continuous loft overhead.  The same frames, at the same time, contain individual slices and something that spans the both of them, while relating in rhythm to each other and also relating to the existing doorway.  That’s some nice interplay there, not to mention a great way to create some very usable and pleasing “rooms” in an otherwise small apartment.  The netting is a nice final touch – safety while preventing the loft from becoming cut off from the rest of the space (not to mention I find it works with the rough frame aesthetic).

The rest of the place is a plethora of custom furniture all also made from the same raw wood detailing, all pairing nicely with the wood flooring (that I’m guessing came with the turn-of-the-century tenement building).  The table hides a fridge and doubles as a cutting board and kitchen work surface, the desk and cubbies are reconfigurable to house much more storage than might be expected.   Light, airy, compact yet active and uncluttered, this is nicely done work.

Bence Home by Studio Bunyik