Posts Tagged ‘Science’

h1

The poison chronicles

November 29, 2018

“The lack of regulation meant that companies could pretty much put whatever they wanted into food with no fear of being held accountable. “[Food] wasn’t safety tested, because there were no rules requiring that,” says Blum. “It wasn’t labeled because there were no rules requiring that anyone tell you what was in your food. And it wasn’t illegal even if you killed someone.”

Companies were adding copper to vegetables to make them look greener and 20 Mule Team Borax to butter as a preservative—assuming it was butter and not beef tallow or ground-up cow stomach dyed to look like butter. Spices contained things like ground coconut shells, charred rope, brick dust, even floor sweepings. Honey was often little more than dyed corn syrup. The phrase “a muddy cup of coffee” might date back to this era, when ground coffee typically contained dyed sawdust, tree bark, or charred bone, and fake coffee beans were made out of wax and dirt. “I’m especially bitter about this, because I love coffee,” says Blum.

Dairy suppliers were among the worst offenders, adding pureed calf brains to milk to make it look more like rich cream, thinning the milk with water and gelatin, and then adding dyes, chalk, or plaster dust to correct the color. Worst of all, they added formaldehyde—then widely used as an embalming fluid to slow the decomposition of corpses—to milk as a preservative. (The additives were given innocuous names like Rosaline and Preservaline.) Hundreds of children were sickened, and many died, from the tainted milk. Formaldehyde was also used as a preservative in meat.

That was the driving force behind Wiley’s radical “Poison Squad” project. (He actually referred to it as “hygienic table trials”; journalists gave it the more colorful moniker.)  He recruited several young men to be his guinea pigs—all of whom signed waivers—and provided them with three healthy square meals a day. The catch: half of them also were given capsules containing borax, salicylic acid, or formaldehyde. Wiley started with the borax, thinking it would be the safest additive, and was alarmed at how quickly his squad members sickened.

The results convinced Wiley that federal regulation was necessary to protect American citizens from the dangerous and fraudulent practices of food suppliers. Naturally, industry leaders pushed back against Wiley’s proposed legislation. The National Association of Food Manufacturers formed around this time, along with chemical industry manufacturing associations, as companies pooled their resources to oppose the ominous specter of government regulation. They even instituted a smear campaign against Wiley. One trade journal called him “the man who is doing all he can to destroy American business.”

With Roosevelt’s support, Congress finally passed the Meat Inspection Act and the Pure Food and Drug Act in 1906.”

— excerpt from this great article at arstechinca

It’s amazing to me that this was just over a hundred years ago.  That until then you had to spend time and effort and worry to check every thing and even with that work could never know for sure if what you were getting was what you thought you were getting and you or others could easily be sickened or maimed or die.

It’s also a great story about the scientific method, of curiosity, of rigour, of courage in the face of opposition, and a commitment to your fellow human beings.

Definitively makes me want to read the book about Dr Wiley.

 

h1

Wonder Wednesday

October 3, 2018

Ah!  Check out this old map of the Ontario Science Centre.  I remember it well!  Many great memories of visiting and all the exhibits within… Lasers!  The giant And/Or logic circuit gate ball drop!  The miniature lift locks!  Shadow freezing!  Parabolic disk whispering!  And one of my ever-favs, this amazing 2-story contraption that required four people on bicycles to pump water to the top through a series of pipes that could then be released down more transparent pipes to run turbines that would power lights, fans, and a model train.  Great stuff, and a great axonometric map that shows it all.

Hilarious story:  In earlier versions, the map didn’t include the word “Exploring” before the word “Space”, and so for many years I never visited that tower, as my young mind translated that to “Empty Space”, like it must be some sort of strange store room ready for future expansion or something…  ah, silly me.  Especially given how much I loves me my space program and the wonders of outer space!

Bonus postscript:  The OSC building itself is quite nifty, a brutalist gem nestled within a lush forest heading down a steep incline.  The double bridge leading from the reception building to the tower building was amazingly serene and a nice transition from the everyday world behind that built excitement.  Traveling down the massive escalators to the valley building meant passing seemingly hundreds of trees.  The grand hall was indeed grand, and the towers suitably impressive areas for exhibits.  The mezzanines looking down on exhibits below let the eyes wander from wonder to wonder.  Visiting the building was as exciting for me as was what was in it.

h1

Wonder Wednesday

January 17, 2018

Some slow mo vids of sand on shaker tables!

https://photos.app.goo.gl/qz6cRX7SK99DNWH02

https://photos.app.goo.gl/ZRCew3x7p6fhurml2

https://photos.app.goo.gl/hpWutAhEvY0X8ze03

(Taken at the Exploratorium yesterday)